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Synonyms

A synonym is a word that shares the same or very similar meaning with another word. These words are not spelled the same or pronounced the same way, they just have a similar meaning and can be interchangeable without significantly changing the meaning or tone of conversation. A dictionary of synonyms is called Thesaurus, and […]

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“as useful as a chocolate teapot”

It is idiom and means that it is totally useless. Also used “as useful as a chocolate fireguard” Examples: A car in a heavy traffic jam is as useful as a chocolate teapot. That umbrella is stuck inside out, so it’s about as useful as a chocolate teapot right now. If the referee gives the opponents a penalty, he yells, ‘When they circumcised you they threw away the wrong part.’ If […]

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“sell out” and “sell off” meaning

If a supply of something sells out, there is no more of that thing to buy. If a shop sells out of something, it sells all its stocks of it, so that there is no longer any left for people to buy. In the US it is used as “sellout“. Very simmilar si: sell off: The company is selling off the less profitable parts of its business. “sell […]

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“Dunno” meaning

Dunno is used in written English to represent an informal way of saying ‘don’t know‘. Examples: I dunno, maybe he was just trying to ensure the job was well done. His friend asked, “What happened?” to which Mr Kennedy replied “dunno, must have been [too many] and run out of air”. Instead of talking about, ohhh, I dunno, fixing our damaged public health infrastructure, or putting people back to work, Trump produced a veritable cornucopia of […]

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IDIOMS: Donkey’s years

Years and years. A very long time. And that’s basically it! It is believed that this expression originated from “donkey’s ears” in the early 20th century and referred to the considerable length of the animal’s ears, on top of that donkeys are believed to live a long time. Ears rhymes with years and there you […]

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“interested” vs. “interesting”

Try and guess if these two sentences mean the same. “You look so interested.” “You look so interesting.” They’re not. interested (adj.) – wanting to give attention to something or someone interesting (adj.) – keeps your interest Examples: Many men are interested in getting to know Paula. You go ahead with you plan; I’m not interested. Many men find Paula interesting, so they try […]

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You’re Very Fierce

I remember a long time ago, in secondary school, I constructed the following sentence: My teacher is very fierce. My teacher corrected me and said, it should be “strict” instead of “fierce“. Is that so? At that time, I accepted her explanation as she’s more learned than I was. Today, I believe there is a […]

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“learned” vs. “learnt”

Is there a difference? Yes and No. learn (v.) learned (adj.) If the word “learn” is used as a verb, then there is no difference at all in the meaning and usage of the words “learned” and “learnt“ in its past form. I honestly don’t know why the spelling is inconsistent. It’s not really true to say that one […]

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“inspiration” vs. “aspiration”

“Inspiration” comes from the word “inspire“, while “aspiration” comes from the word “aspire“. inspiration (n.) – a feeling of enthusiasm that gives you idea(s) to do something aspiration (n.) – desire to achieve something Examples: The recent speech was an inspiration to all of us to strive and work harder. My inspiration to be successful comes from failures of renown figures. […]

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I Founded It!

We know that the past participle of “find” is “found“. For instance: What did you find in the cave? I found some treasures there. Sometimes the word “founded” is used in a sentence but it gives an entirely different meaning. For instance: The organisation was founded by a prominent Chinese businessman. (√) Take note that “founded” has nothing to do with the […]

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