Wat4English.com

BACK TO ENGLISH

IDIOMS: Under the weather

If someone feels under the weather, they feel ill or slightly unwell. The origin of this particular phrase might have something to do with sailing. In the 1900s, when a sailor was feeling sick on a boat during a storm or some other severe weather conditions, he was usually sent below deck so he could […]

Continue Reading

IDIOMS: And Bob’s your uncle!

Have you ever thought about how strangely some of the English idioms may sound to non-native speakers? Here’s a great example! “And Bob’s your uncle!” is a phrase used to conclude something, usually a set of instructions. Non natives would perhaps use a non-idiomatic expressions like “and it’s done” or “and there you have it”. […]

Continue Reading

IDIOMS: All mouth and no trousers

“All mouth and no trousers” is another phrase used mainly and heard primarily on the British Islands, meaning empty boasting. We use this phrase to describe someone who is boastful, arrogant, full of shallow talk, or someone who is just showing off. It’s commonly used when someone says they’re going to do something (usually something […]

Continue Reading

IDIOMS: A piece of cake

This phrase is most commonly used to point out that something is really easy or easy to accomplish. It’s a piece of cake! The origin of this idiom dates back to 1800s when cakes were given out as prizes for winning competitions. Unlike most bizarre idioms, this one probably originates in the United States. Slaves […]

Continue Reading

Homophone meaning

Homophone is a word that sounds alike another word but has a completely different meaning. Homophones can be problematic not just for foreign speakers of English, but for native speakers as well. Since these pairs of words are usually pronounced the same (to some varying extent), it can be difficult sometimes to remember the correct spelling. Here’s an example […]

Continue Reading

“Dove” or “Dived”

The verb “dive” has both an irregular and regular form. You can use both and both are correct. Speakers in North America use dove while the British seem to prefer dived. “Dived” is the traditional past tense and past participle of “to dive,” but “dove” has crept in over the last two centuries — particularly in the US. […]

Continue Reading

“betcha” meaning

It is a short form of “bet you“: meaning that you are very sure about something. It represents the sound of the phrase bet you when it is spoken quickly or it is used especially in the phrase you betcha as an enthusiastic way of saying “yes” Examples: I betcha some of them even considered leaving the team. A: “Hey Frank, do you want to come with us to the movies?” B: “You betcha I do!” The difference between you betcha and I betcha? I betcha is colloquial for I bet […]

Continue Reading

“gotta” meaning

It is a short form of have got to. Gotta is a way of writing got to that shows how these words are pronounced in the expression have got to in casual speech: have gotta.  Have gotta is an informal way of saying that something is necessary or must be true. In very informal language, gotta is sometimes written and spoken without have. Examples: I gotta go now. […]

Continue Reading

“gonna” meaning

It is an informal for going to. A way of writing ‘going to’ that shows how it sounds in informal conversation. Examples: What are you gonna do? It’s not gonna be easy. I think I’m gonna need some help. More: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/gonna

Continue Reading

“under” vs “below”

The prepositions under and below are interchangeable. Under is used much more widely. When you’re not sure which word to use, use under. It is more likely to be correct.  Both below and under can mean ‘lower than’. Below  All the common uses of below are related to the idea of “lower or less than,” as in these examples: The game is suitable for children below the age […]

Continue Reading